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Gypsy Runaway Train by The Roys - A Track-by-Track Review

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The RoysTuesday, June 4th, The Roys latest album, Gypsy Runaway Train hits the streets. That is a fitting way to say how the album gets released as the title describes how this dynamic sibling duo's lives exist on the road. Commenting on the name, Gypsy Runaway Train, "I wrote it with my friend Morry Trent," explains Lee Roy. "We wanted to capture the essence of the lives we lead as musicians. We are like gypsies on the run."

What comes through on this album is the pleasure that The Roys had putting it all together. The joy and satisfaction comes through as clear as the vocals and instruments. This is one of those "happy albums" that shares the joyous emotion with the listener. They're smiling all the way through and it's clear as a train's bell.

This album is alive as it sings of life's ups and downs. Even the sad songs are a pleasure to listen to. It is honest and pure while presenting this group in a natural way. This is exactly what we would expect from this group and they delivered a real winner here.

The album consists of thirteen outstanding tracks including original material or old favorites like "Blue Moon of Kentucky." Here, The Roys put forth a collection of "cover songs" that are in essence fan favorites that their fans have requested to be recorded. In this track by track review, we hope to share with the reader and the fan, an added dimension to the music.

The opening song, "You Can Count on My Love" comes on strong and alive with an up-tempo bluegrass sound with Elaine Roy leading vocals. This song sets the tone for the album -- lively bluegrass music filled with emotion and the ups and downs of life.

The Roys: "You Can Count on My Love" from Gypsy Runaway Train

"Blue Moon of Kentucky" is as traditional as bluegrass music gets. On this track, The Roys give it fresh presentation that brings new life into an old favorite.

Where would bluegrass be without heartbreak, tragedy or loss? These are the things that embody bluegrass music and "Another Minute" is a strong reflection on the loss of those we love. Written by Lee Roy, this song brings back memories that everybody can relate to.

The Roys: "Another Minute" from Gypsy Runaway Train

"Born with a Hammer in My Hand" was written by Shawn Lane and made popular by the award winning Blue Highway, The Roys resurect this song while keeping the essence of the song totally intact. The music is sharp, crisp and solid. The Roys do a great job on this track.

Slowing it down just a step, "I Wonder Where You Are Tonight" is a traditional country favorite. This song highlights another dimension of the talents of The Roys. The mandolin and banjo work together as they blend in and out of the lyrics. The harmonies are perfect as is the presentation. Here is a song that passes the test of time and The Roys certainly added a few extra heart-beats to its eternal life as a great song.

"He Took Your Place" was popularised by Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs. This gospel favorite hasn't been recorded by too many other groups so having it on this collection was a real pleasant surprise. Elaine does justice to this gospel melody as she emotes sincerity from beginning to end.

Here's a song by Lee co-written with Arlis Albritton and Josh Thompson that describes the effort in breaking some bad habits. Now and then they still show their ugly head but, in this song, Lee admits that he's "Workin' on It."

The Roys confess that they are blessed with the opportunity to do what they love and are happy to give back. In this song, "Enough For Me," they sing about being satisfied with their blessings. They give their all in their life and the music they create.

Fiddle and banjo sing out in the Merle Haggard favorite, "Ramblin Fever." The Roys drift back to their country side with this favorite. The up-tempo and fun that flows from this song shows just how much The Roys enjoy what they do. When they're enjoying themselves on this recording, that emotion comes through loud and clear.

"What Gives You the Right" is an Adam Steffey tune that The Roys present effortlessly. Once again, the duo's harmonies round out the song. The pickin' is precise and frisky as Adam would want it. This is one of those songs on this album that will probably become a favorite of the fans.

A familiar song to bluegrass fans, "Those Memories of You" comes to life in this Allan Bryant song. This is bluegrass with a solid high-lonesome sound, full instrumentation and great balance.

Elaine wrote "Half of Me" following her divorce. She admits she may not be able to perform it live because of the strong emotional ties to her own situation. Filled with emotion, truth and heartbreak, she presents this song beautifully on this album. Randy Kohrs' dobro add the tear jerk sound that this song demands.

The grand finale is the title track, "Gypsy Runaway Train" which Lee wrote with Morry Trent. This is what the life of a touring musician is all about. This train makes stops at town after town. This song sounds like a train that rumbles down the track. Bluegrass and trains naturally come together and The Roys certainly put them both on the right track with this song.

The Roys Talk to Cybergrass About Their New Album Gypsy Runaway TrainBlue Moon of Kentucky

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